August 19, 2019: Nature Visions 2019 – Followup

Good afternoon fellow NVPS members:
 
This is a follow-up to my recent email regarding Nature Visions.
 
I have received emails from a number of you regarding difficulties you are having registering for Nature Visions. As I mentioned in my previous email, the ticketing this year is being handled by the Hylton Center’s own ticketing contractor. While we objected to this, Hylton has no choice but to go this route as it is in the contract with the ticketing contractor …ie. All events at the Hylton Center must be ticketed through them. We have had issues, to say the least. In my previous email I strongly suggested that you wait a while before ordering your tickets. Let me fill you in on where we stand now.

There is a short video which Punit Sinha, President of NV, prepared which gives a good demonstration on how to order tickets. Go to the NV web here https://naturevisions.org/event/tickets-and-registration/ and click on the link to the video.

  1. There will be a $30 discount for individuals who were members of the cooperating clubs as of June 1, 2019. Hylton has not yet built in the discount to the ticketing system. I will let you know when that is done so you can receive the discount. It is only good for one session…for example, if you order a ticket for a $20 session, then the discount is applied to that session. You cannot use the remaining $10 on another session. If you order the 3-day pass for $160, then the amount you pay, not including service fee, will be $130.
  2. Some of you were being charged upwards of $26 service fee for the 3-day pass. This was an error on Hylton’s part. It should have been only $5. Same with the 2-day and 1-day passes. If you had gone ahead and ordered tickets and paid the incorrect service fee, then Hylton will refund the difference. If you do not receive the refund in 7-14 days, then contact the Hylton box office or contact me.

On submitting images for the competition…..below is an email sent out by Stan Collyer, who heads up the review committee for image submissions. Please read it carefully as it answers many questions that you may have on submissions. Although it was originally sent out to only club NV reps, I thought it best if I shared it with all of you. Remember, you have until Sept. 13 to submit images. Again, contact me if questions.
 
Best,
Roger Lancaster, NVPS rep to NV
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From: Stan Collyer, Chair, NV Image Review Committee
Sent: Monday, August 19, 2019 10:48 AM
To:
 Dear Camera Club Representatives and Alternates,

We will soon begin the Nature Visions image review process, to ensure that all entries conform to the published rules.  This will happen three or four times. As soon as each review is completed by our Committee, images not in compliance will be removed from the Visual Pursuits software, and a summary will be sent to this mailing list. (I’m using the most recent list of club representatives and alternates.  Please let me know if there are any changes.)

It will be the responsibility of the relevant club rep (or alternate) to inform the entrant, and (if the image was submitted on or before September 6) give him or her the chance to replace the entry.

Before too many entries are submitted, it would be a good idea to remind your members to read carefully the rules for both the Nature and Photo Art competitions.  There have been no changes since last year.  The most common problem by far has been failure to adhere to the “Human Elements” rule for Nature images.  The Committee looks carefully for power lines, fence posts, plowed fields, etc.  Another mistake concerns the rules for image manipulation.  In particular, there should be no addition of textures in Nature submissions; textures are permitted in Photo Art submissions only if created by the submitter.  Also, please remember that any image conforming to the Nature rules may not be submitted to the Photo Art competition.  Submitting to the wrong competition was a frequent reason for rejection last year, especially regarding “abstract” images.  In short, if the image doesn’t look realistic, it belongs in Photo Art.

We realize that some of these rules can be open to interpretation.  Fortunately, most problems last year resulted from pretty obvious mistakes; very few were close calls.  If the submitter reads the rules carefully, and the Committee does its best to apply them consistently, hopefully we can avoid any hurt feelings.

Many thanks!

Stan Collyer

Chair, Image Review Committee

This entry was posted in Activities, Nature Visions.